Visual Studio 2017 version 15.3 Release Notes

Release Date: August 18, 2017 – Visual Studio 2017 version 15.3.1

Issues Fixed in August 18, 2017 Release

These are the customer-reported issues addressed in this version:


Summary: What’s New in this Release

  • Accessibility Improvements make Visual Studio more accessible than ever.
  • Azure Function Tools are included in the Azure development workload. You can develop Azure Function applications locally and publish directly to Azure.
  • You can now build applications in Visual Studio 2017 that run on Azure Stack and government clouds, like Azure in China.
  • We improved .NET Core development support for .NET Core 2.0, and Windows Nano Server containers.
  • In Visual Studio IDE, we improved Sign In and Identity, the start page, Lightweight Solution Load, and setup CLI. We also improved refactoring, code generation and Quick Actions.
  • The Visual Studio Editor has better accessibility due to the new ‘Blue (Extra Contrast)’ theme and improved screen reader support.
  • We improved the Debugger and diagnostics experience. This includes Point and Click to Set Next Statement. We’ve also refreshed all nested values in variable window, and made Open Folder debugging improvements.
  • Xamarin has a new standalone editor for editing app entitlements.
  • The Open Folder and CMake Tooling experience is updated. You can now use CMake 3.8.
  • We made improvements to the IntelliSense engine, and to the project and the code wizards for C++ Language Services.
  • Visual C++ Toolset supports command-prompt initialization targeting.
  • We added the ability to use C# 7.1 Language features.
  • You can install TypeScript versions independent of Visual Studio updates.
  • We added support for Node 8 debugging.
  • NuGet has added support for new TFMs (netcoreapp2.0, netstandard2.0, Tizen), Semantic Versioning 2.0.0, and MSBuild integration of NuGet warnings and errors.
  • Visual Studio now offers .NET Framework 4.7 development tools to supported platforms with 4.7 runtime included.
  • We added clusters of related events to the search query results in the Application Insights Search tool.
  • We improved syntax support for SQL Server 2016 in Redgate SQL Search.
  • We enabled support for Microsoft Graph APIs in Connected Services.

Read more at https://www.visualstudio.com/en-gb/news/releasenotes/vs2017-relnotes#15.3.26730.08

 

.NET Core 2.0 and ASP.NET Core 2.0 Released

Been busy past couple of weeks, but if like me you are catching up… on 14th Aug, Microsoft released .NET Core 2.0, including ASP.NET Core 2.0

.NET Core 2.0

.NET and C# – Get Started in 10 Minutes

ASP.NET Core 2.0

This release features compatibility with .NET Core 2.0, tooling support in Visual Studio 2017 version 15.3, and the new Razor Pages user-interface design paradigm.  For a full list of updates, you can read the release notes and you can check the list of changed items in the ASP.NET Announcements GitHub repository for a list of changes from previous versions of ASP.NET Core.  The latest SDK and tools can be downloaded from https://dot.net/core.

Read more at https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/webdev/2017/08/14/announcing-asp-net-core-2-0/

 

 

Latest SSRS Report Viewer Now Generally Available

Microsoft has just released its latest update to the Report Viewer for SQL Server generally available.

This update replaces the Report Viewer 2015 version and has included several enhancements made for SSRS 2016; including modern browser support, cross-browser printing, report parameter positioning, and a modern look-and-feel.

As with previous releases of the SSRS Report Viewer Control, it is also backwards compatible and works with SSRS versions 2008-2017.

For more details please visit: http://tinyurl.com/ReportViewer2017

To install Microsoft.ReportingServices.ReportViewerControl.WebForms, run the following command in the Package Manager Console

Install-Package Microsoft.ReportingServices.ReportViewerControl.WebForms

See Reporting Services Blog for additional information https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/sqlrsteamblog


About the Report Viewer control

We’ve heard from many of you using the existing Report Viewer 2015 control in your existing ASP.NET Web Forms apps and awaiting an updated version with, among other things, modern browser support. This update is for you.

A few things to know about this Report Viewer control:

  • It’s an ASP.NET Web Forms control (there’s a Windows Forms version as well) for your existing apps. (Developing new web apps on ASP.NET Core/MVC and other web frameworks? Know that your scenario is on our radar as well.)
  • It enables you to embed paginated (RDL) reports into your app. (Looking to embed Power BI reports or mobile reports? We’re not building that support into the existing Report Viewer control since it’s limited to ASP.NET Web Forms apps, but you can embed any report using an iframe and the rs:Embed=true URL parameter.)
  • It supersedes the Report Viewer 2015 version and includes several enhancements we made for SSRS 2016: modern browser support, cross-browser printing, report parameter positioning, and a modern look-and-feel.
  • It works with SSRS 2008-2017, and with paginated reports stored in Power BI Report Server.

What’s new in this update

With this update, the Report Viewer control

  • Includes Microsoft.SqlServer.Types and SqlServerSpatial140 assemblies, which you may need to render reports that contain maps.
  • Won’t affect your app’s version of jQuery.
  • Won’t affect your app’s jQuery UI CSS.
  • Supports the SizeToReportContent setting in IE11 and Firefox.
  • Reduces occurrences of redundant scrollbars in IE11.
  • Shows correct toolbar buttons on pages whose ResponseEncoding is not UTF-8.

Install the NuGet package

To install the Report Viewer control into your app,

  1. Open your ASP.NET Web Forms project in Visual Studio 2015 or 2017.
  2. Open the NuGet Package Manager Console (Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Console).
  3. Enter this command in the console:
    Install-Package Microsoft.ReportingServices.ReportViewerControl.WebForms

That’s it; your project now has the files you need.

Add a Report Viewer control to your page

If your project doesn’t reference an earlier version of the Report Viewer control, you’re ready to add a Report Viewer control to your page. You’ll need to add

  • A Register tag.
  • A ScriptManager control.
  • The ReportViewer control itself.

Your page will look something like the following:

<%@ Page Language=”C#” AutoEventWireup=”true” CodeFile=”Default.aspx.cs” Inherits=”_Default” %>
<%@ Register Assembly=”Microsoft.ReportViewer.WebForms, Version=14.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=89845dcd8080cc91″ Namespace=”Microsoft.Reporting.WebForms” TagPrefix=”rsweb” %>

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns=”http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml”>

<head runat=”server”>
< title></title>
< /head>

<body>
< form id=”form1″ runat=”server”>

  <asp:ScriptManager runat=”server”></asp:ScriptManager>

  <rsweb:ReportViewer ID=”ReportViewer1″ runat=”server” ProcessingMode=”Remote” Width=”850px” Height=”680px”>
<ServerReport ReportServerUrl=”http://your-report-server/reportserver” ReportPath=”/Some Folder/Some Report” />
</rsweb:ReportViewer>

</form>
< /body>

</html>

Just use your ReportServerUrl and ReportPath in place of the sample values above.

Check out this article for a step-by-step walkthrough.

Update an existing app

If your existing project references a previous version of the Report Viewer control, you’ll need to update a few references in your web pages and web.config file; see this article for more info.

Source: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/sqlrsteamblog/2017/07/27/updated-report-viewer-control-now-generally-available/

Amazon brings .Net Core support to AWS Cloud

aws.jpg

Re-post from http://opensourceforu.com/2017/07/amazon-brings-net-core-support-aws-cloud/

Encouraging developers to massively build cross-platform applications, Amazon has added .Net Core support to its AWS Cloud services. The series that has been upgraded with the new support includes the AWS CodeStar and AWS CloudBuild services.

“The support for .Net Core in AWS CodeStar and AWS CodeBuild opens the door for .Net developers to take advantage of the benefits of Continuous Integration and Delivery when building .Net based solutions on AWS,” said Tara Walker, technical evangelist, Amazon Web Services (AWS), in a statement.

The AWS team launched the CodeStar service back in April for Amazon EC2, AWS Elastic Beanstalk and AWS Lambda projects using five programming languages, including JavaScript, Java, Python, Ruby and PHP. Though the original list of supported languages was covering a large part, Amazon has now planned to target developers on Microsoft’s Azure by enabling .Net Core support.

Deploy code on Amazon EC2 and AWS Lambda

Developers can leverage the latest support to build and deploy their .Net Core application code to both Amazon EC2 and AWS Lambda. This ability comes through the CodeBuild service that brings two new project templates to AWS CodeStar for .Net Core applications. Also, there is sample code and a full software development toolchain to ease the development.

Importantly, the presence of Visual Studio 2017 is required alongside the AWS Toolkit for Visual Studio 2017 to start building .Net Core applications for Amazon’s cloud solution. You can also deploy your existing .Net Core code enable your applications on AWS.

by  on July 13, 2017